Best High Protein Foods

By Alessandro Carosi

I’m vegetarian and lately i have been doing some research about fruit and veggies i can obtain proteins cause not eating properly it caused me some health problems,i do recommend to everyone to become vegetarian and if capable vegan would be even better,in my case i need to give up my cheese and eggs addiction and then i will happily join the vegan movement but for who is vegetarian whoever is the reason here a list of some food you can get proteins

By http://www.bodybuilding.com

Protein builds your body. It creates muscle. It controls hunger. It’s a win-win! Eating enough protein is key, but so is variety, since each kind has its own amino acid profile. Go beyond chicken and protein powder with these great high-protein foods.

Eggs

Protein Content: 6 g per 1 large egg

These white orbs are one of the most perfect high-protein foods at the supermarket: cheap, versatile, low-carb, and packed with branched-chain amino acids. Look for eggs fortified with extra omega-3 fatty acids to give your breakfast scramble an extra nutrition boost.

Eggs

Hard-boiled eggs are one of the most portable protein foods. You can also make a shake with dried egg protein powder instead of whey.

High Protein Dairy

Greek Yogurt

Protein Content: 23 g per 8-oz. serving

Greek yogurt has become such a popular choice because it has twice as much protein as other types of yogurt. It’s also rich in bone-building calcium and probiotic bacteria, which is great for gut health. Look for plain Greek yogurt to keep sugar—and your weight—in check.

Cottage Cheese

Protein Content: 14 g per 1/2-cup serving

Make cottage cheese your go-to protein for a healthy late-night snack. It’s high in casein, a dairy protein that digests more slowly than whey. Slow-digesting protein feeds your muscles all night so they don’t catabolize, and it keeps you from waking up starving at 3 a.m.

cottage cheese

Swiss Cheese

Protein Content: 8 g per 1-oz. serving

Ounce for ounce, Swiss cheese provides more protein than other varieties commonly available in the supermarket, making it a muscle-friendly option for your sandwiches and burgers. If you’re concerned about the calorie density of full-fat Swiss, low-fat versions have a protein-to-fat ratio of around 8-to-1 while still providing good flavor.

2-Percent Milk

Protein Content: 8 g per 1-cup serving

You could chug watery, flavorless skim milk, or you could enjoy the richer taste of 2 percent while getting a little extra fat to help you absorb the milk’s vitamin D and get you closer to your macro targets.

Organic milk has the highest nutrient content, including protein and omega-3s.[1] Mix it with protein powder for a revved-up shake.

Whey Or Casein Protein Powder

Protein Content: 24 g per scoop, on average

Whey protein powder is clean, fast-digesting, and most of its calories come from protein. It’s also convenient—just mix it with water in a shaker bottle. Reach for protein powder whenever you need quick, no-prep protein, like after a workout, for an on-the-go breakfast, or alongside a low-protein meal.

If you need something that’ll help you hide from hunger a little longer, go for slow-digesting casein powder instead of whey. It won’t hit your muscles as fast, but it can keep you full for hours and can help you lose fat without losing muscle mass.

You can also use protein powder to make high-protein pancakes. They make a great pre-workout or post-workout snack if you need a break from shakes.

If you’re sensitive to artificial sweeteners, look for an unsweetened protein powder or one sweetened with stevia.

Smoothies

Protein Content: 16 g per 1-cup serving, on average

Up your protein-shake game by blending casein or whey protein powder into a smoothie with fruit for its vitamin content. You can also buy premade smoothie drinks, but make sure they have a substantial dose of protein (at least 20 grams for a 2-cup bottle) and not just fruit, which can send you into sugar overload.

smoothies

To make a plant-based smoothie, substitute a vegan protein powder in place of animal-based casein or whey. A blend of rice protein and pea protein is a good option for muscle growth.

Frozen Greek Yogurt

Protein Content: 6 g per 1/2-cup serving

Frozen Greek yogurt is frosty and creamy like ice cream, but contains about twice as much high-quality protein. Compare brands and look for those with the lowest sugar levels (or make it yourself). Some brands actually list fruit before sugar in the ingredient list, which is a plus.

High Protein Plant-Based Foods

Navy Beans

Protein Content: 20 g per 1-cup serving

Heart-healthy beans are a fantastically cheap vegetarian protein source, and of the most commonly available canned legumes, navy beans lead the way. They’re also rich in fiber, which is important for healthy eating.

Mash navy beans with garlic and lemon as a hummus alternative.

Dried Lentils

Protein Content: 13 g per 1/4-cup serving

Inexpensive dry lentils are a sure-fire way to ramp up your intake of protein, fiber, and a range of vital minerals. Unlike other dried beans, lentils don’t require an annoying presoak. Simply simmer until tender, about 20 minutes. For a nutritious lunch, toss cooked lentils with chopped chicken breast, diced vegetables, and a lemon vinaigrette.

Peanut Butter

Protein Content: 8 g per 2-tbsp serving

Though not as trendy as other nut butters like almond, peanut butter still leads the way in the protein department. Make sure to watch labels for sugar, though. Natural versions made from just peanuts are best—some stores even let you grind your own.

If you’re working to get your weight in check, look for peanut butter powder, which has less fat but the same protein content. You can even use the powder for baking.

Mixed Nuts

Protein Content: 6 g per 2-oz. serving

Nuts like peanuts, cashews, and almonds make for a crunchy way to add more protein and healthy unsaturated fats to your diet. Keep a can in your glove compartment for hunger emergencies. If you’re watching your sodium intake, look for packages labelled “unsalted”.

Bean Chips

Protein Content: 4 g per 1-oz. serving

If you’re craving crunchy chips, you’ll be hard pressed to find a better option than the ones made with protein-rich black beans. For bonus points, use them as a delivery vessel for a homemade Greek yogurt dip.

Tofu

Protein Content: 12 g per 3-oz. serving

If you’re looking to go meat-free, slabs of tofu can fill you up with soy protein. Slices of firm tofu work well in stir-fry, or slap them on the grill to infuse them with some smoky flavor. A good marinade goes a long way. You can even make a smoothie with tofu instead of protein powder.

Edamame

Protein Content: 8 g per 1/2-cup serving

Another great vegetarian option, these nutrient-packed green soybeans will give your diet a boost of plant protein, fiber, vitamins, and minerals.To avoid snack boredom, prepare shelled, frozen edamame according to package directions, then season with fresh lemon juice, smoked paprika, and a pinch of salt.

Green Peas

Protein Content: 7 g per 1-cup serving

While protein is not abundant in most vegetables, green peas contain enough that you’ll want to keep a bag stashed in your freezer at all times. They’re also high in fiber, so they help manage your weight and cravings.

Wheat Germ

Protein Content: 6 g per 1-oz. serving

The wheat grain is made up of three components—endosperm, bran, and germ. The germ is the most nutrient-dense part and includes notable amounts of plant-based protein. You can use it to add a protein boost to your oatmeal, pancakes, and even shakes.

Soba Noodles

Protein Content: 12 g per 3-oz. serving

Consider using these buckwheat Japanese-style noodles for your pasta nights since they are a better protein source than most wheat-based noodles. Even better, they cook in about half the time as whole-wheat pasta.To remove the excess starch that can make the noodles gummy, rinse cooked soba after draining.

Quinoa

Protein Content: 8 g per 1-cup serving

Among whole grains, South American quinoa (technically a seed) is a rarity in that it contains a full arsenal of essential amino acids, meaning that it’s a complete protein with muscle-building potential.Toasting quinoa in a dry skillet or saucepan before simmering it in water can enhance its natural nutty flavor.

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